Predicting the future of legal services

The reflections on Predicting the future of legal services contain three parts. 

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Future law: Legal technology / IT predictions for 2018

With Future law: Legal technology / IT predictions for 2018Brian Inkster of Scotland joins The Dialogue community with his post-Hogmanay predictions on what technology holds (or doesn’t) for legal services in 2018

Amongst Brian’s many distinctive traits is his devotion to crofting and crofting law, the significance of which for all law firms, I will blog about later in the year.  

Over to Brian… 

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Seven articles to help you understand how AI can transform your legal practice

It’s been a busy month for the Kira Systems team with the announcement of our SOC2 Certification, enhanced document classifier, and new customers and partnerships. With all this buzz around artificial intelligence (AI), you may be wondering how much of it is real and can help you understand how AI can transform your legal practice.

To help you understand what is really happening with AI in the legal context, in 7 Articles to Help You Understand How AI Can Transform Your Legal Practice we’ve pulled together seven articles that cut through the hype.

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(aosphere + Neota Logic = #RegTech apps)

(aosphere + Neota Logic = #RegTech apps) helps financial services clients reduce risk.

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Deloitte, KPMG & PwC all agree: Is law listening?

Back in October 2015, the inimitable Michael Mills, chief strategy officer and co-founder of Neota Logic, wrote this clever article on LinkedIn: Deloitte, KPMG & PwC all agree: Is law listening? With the rising interest (and concern amongst many BigLaw firms), I am pleased to re-post Deloitte, KPMG & PwC all agree: Is law listening? on The Dialogue.

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From collegiate to collaborative

Joel returns to The Dialogue with From collegiate to collaborative, an outstanding post adding to the growing understanding of how better collaboration creates competitive advantage.

With increasing competition from freelancers, boutiques and solo specialists, most professional service firms are realising that their primary source of competitive advantage is the ‘collective’. By winning and delivering together, they can offer things the one-person bands can’t. The edge is not from economies of scale, but rather in more holistic advice and lower client transactions cost. The value proposition is not cross-selling but integrated cross-practice problem-solving.

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